Stories

Managing Land for Wildlife Economically

Fred Ernst owns 670 acres of forestland in Acworth, NH. His interest in managing land for wildlife began during his career in a forest-based industry. As Fred describes it, “We practiced sustainability of forests and encouraging wildlife was a natural part of the process. When I bought the land in Acworth in 2001, the land had been “high graded” [most commercial quality trees removed], which had a lot to do with my ideas for improvement”.

Fremont Does a BioBlitz

In the early hours of a Saturday morning in spring, a group of Fremont citizens armed with binoculars and field guides were alert and quiet, listening intently to the chorus of birds and scribbling on their notepads.  “Hermit thrush.  Scarlet Tanager. Chickadee. Wait! Was that a pileated woodpecker?”. A short distance away another group huddled over a small flower, riffling through a field guide to identify it.  A third group was on the hunt for reptiles, amphibians, mammals and insects.

Volunteers in the town of Campton used maps and data from the Wildlife Action Plan to update existing town documents.

Got Wildlife?

Can you help us figure out how to incorporate wildlife information into our Master Plan Update? What steps should we take to include wildlife in our Natural Resources Inventory? How can we educate our residents about the value of wildlife and habitats? The Taking Action for Wildlife team has been hard at work helping communities answer these questions and use data and maps from the updated 2015 Wildlife Action Plan.

This is a spotted salamander, a species that requires vernal pools to complete its life cycle. Photo by Victor Young.

Vernal Pools: An Important Resource for Wildlife

Vernal pools are home to many wildlife species, including those that breed exclusively in this habitat type – fairy shrimp, wood frogs, and spotted salamanders. “These temporary wetlands are often small and dry in late summer, and therefore are easily overlooked during land-use planning,” explains NH Fish and Game wetlands biologist Michael Marchand.

Biologists study New Hampshire’s rivers and streams for the presence of certain fish and mussel species to help better understand their distribution. Photo by Mike Marchand.

Spotlight on Wildlife Action Plan Habitats: Defining Watersheds

New Hampshire's Wildlife Action Plan identifies 27 unique habitat types across the state. Many of these are easily recognized and definable, like grasslands or rocky ridges. Others require a bit more thought and consideration of how they should be defined, mapped, and managed.

Beaver with log caught on trail camera - March 14, 2014

Lessons Learned from a Trail Camera

I sat at my desk, eyes glued to my computer screen, flipping slowly through photos. I’m giddy with excitement, enjoying the scenes unfolding, snapshot by snapshot, in front of me. A beaver makes its way out of the pond and passes next to the camera, then in the next shot, I see it is pulling a shockingly large log behind it.  I’ve seen the evidence of beaver’s work so many times, it barely catches my attention anymore, but there is something magical about seeing pictures of the animal at work.

White pine with cones

Good Seed Year for White Pine Trees

Over the past few months, I have been noticing an abundance of white pine cones in the trees around Carroll county. Rather than producing consistent crops of seeds every year, white pine has good seed years every three to five years, with fewer seeds produced in the intervening years.

A Corridor for Wildlife at First Mountain Forest

Larry Ely and Ginger Lawson own First Mountain Forest, a 130-acre parcel recently protected with a conservation easement through the Mahoosuc Land Trust.  A recent walk held on the property (Oct.

Protecting Wildlife in a Changing Climate

New Hampshire's wildlife habitats and the species they support could be significantly altered if the effects of climate change are not addressed - and NH communities are an important part of the solution! More frequent and heavier rain events resulting in extensive flooding, earlier ice outs on our lakes, more variable stream flows, milder winters and hotter, drier summers....

The Greatest Life Under the Sun: Helen Evans

"...Helen Evans remembers the visitors who used to turn up at the door of her old farmhouse. They all wanted the same thing. 'I need some acreage,' they’d say, eyeing the fertile pasture and the expanse of oak-pine forest beyond..." Read more.