Taking Action for Wildlife banner

A Partnership of UNH Cooperative Extension and NH Fish and Game

Stories

The Land Conservation Plan for New Hampshire's Coastal Watersheds, published in 2006, was one of the first studies to draw on information and data from the 2005 NH Wildlife Action Plan. The Coastal Conservation Plan prioritizes coastal watershed areas and offers regional strategies for maintaining diverse wildlife habitat, abundant wetlands, clean water, productive forests, and outstanding recreational opportunities. Four principle resource analyses and maps were developed that captured key natural resource features. The resource maps reflect the best remaining opportunities to conserve Forest Ecosystems,...

Developed in 2008, the Bear-Paw Regional Greenways Conservation Plan identifies and describes those areas that include the region’s most important ecological, biological, and water resources. Using the results of a natural resource inventory completed for Bear-Paw in 2003 along with information from the 2005 NH Wildlife Action Plan, Bear-Paw identified where to focus its conservation efforts. With this information Bear-Paw determined that the most effective way to conserve the region’s water, wildlife habitat, forests and farmland is through the protection of its large unfragmented forests, riparian areas, and important agricultural soils and farms since they present the best opportunity to conserve the most important natural areas in the region. These areas provide “greenways” and “blue...

The Bradford Conservation Commission used Taking Action for Wildlife assistance as a springboard to work on a Natural Resources Inventory completed in 2012, with a set of town maps created for the inventory. In addition to help from the Taking Action for Wildlife staff, the Commission hired  a private company to produce the maps for the Inventory. The Conservation Commission identified five primary areas to focus conservation efforts, based on occurrences of valued wildlife habitat and local knowledge. In deciding on their conservation priorities, they considered the town’s varied habitats – lake, river, wetland, grassland and large unfragmented forest areas, as well...

Recognizing the value of wildlife habitats in town, the Moultonborough Conservation Commission wrote a Wildlife Chapter as a 2013 addendum to their 2007 Natural Resources Inventory. The chapter included a focus on identifying eight priority wildlife habitat areas in town. Impressively, the conservation commission took on and completed this work themselves! One of their ultimate goals is to work on a conservation plan with strategies and proposed actions for protecting the habitats in Moultonborough, especially those in the priority areas.

...

Since 2007, the Effingham Conservation Commission has completed several studies of wildlife and wildlife habitats in town, using the 2005 Wildlife Action Plan as a key reference. View some of the other wildlife studies Effingham has completed, including a two-year grant-funded study identify the best wildlife habitats in town by ground-truthing the 2005 Wildlife Action Plan maps. Most recently, they continued to build on their efforts with an updated Natural Resources Chapter (2013) in their Master Plan...

You never know when the right person is sitting in a room at the right time. That’s what happened when the Lempster Conservation Commission met with the Taking Action for Wildlife Team to discuss starting a Natural Resources Inventory (NRI). Joining the group at that first meeting was a graduate student from Antioch University in Keene, NH, eager to learn more about the conservation commission’s work. The group’s discussion about an NRI piqued his interest, and he later approached Lempster to propose conducting their NRI as part of his Master’s project – it was a perfect match! “This meeting discussion truly turned out to be a "win-win" for all concerned”, remarked Lempster Conservation Commission Chair, Jim Beard. The results were impressive, including a...

As the sea level changes, coastal dynamics and ecosystems change with it. Natural resource managers and community conservation commissions will need to consider how different habitats will be impacted by sea level rise and extreme weather events as they consider what to protect and how.  Salt marshes, one of the most important habitat types in coastal New Hampshire, pose unique challenges in the future. Salt marshes are critical habitat for commercially and recreational important fisheries, they filter runoff to lessen the impact of non-point pollution on our waterbodies, sequester more carbon than mature forests, and they act as sponges to absorb water in flood conditions; protecting adjacent property and adjacent habitats.

Salt marshes are naturally resilient to changes in temperature, salinity, and water level but are limited by elevation and sediment supply.  As sea levels rise, the marsh at the water edge will be drowned. But under the right conditions, salt marshes...

With the amount of snow we’ve had on the ground this winter, it’s hard to believe that spring is here, but it is!  The days are getting longer, birds are singing, and tree buds are starting to swell.  Before we know it this snow will melt away – I promise, it really will – more migrating birds will return, filling our early mornings with their eager songs.  Frogs and salamanders will make their way on rainy nights to vernal pools, deep with snowmelt, for their early spring breeding.  And one creature, a little larger than most, will lumber out of their long winter’s sleep.  Black bears will emerge from their dens with one thing on their minds – food! 

Food is one of the main drivers of black bear behavior.  It’s no surprise that it’s also the primary reason for negative bear-human interactions.  In early spring, as bears emerge from their dens, in search of food after a long winter, it’s common to hear reports of bears taking down bird feeders, getting into trash cans,...

It can be hard to break the habits of winter. Some of us spend the season cozy inside by the fireplace, eating plenty of soups and stews, and catching up with our dear friend Netflix. Others of us strap on our show shoes, put on our skis, or follow the subtle footprints of wildlife in the snow, all in a stubborn effort to not let winter get us down. Whichever completely valid side of the winter weather aisle you fall on, there’s no doubt that spring brings about a change in how we spend our time. The (almost) daily dose of sunshine, chirping birds, and tiny flowers fighting their way above the remnant snow all act as definitive signs and signals telling us one thing, and one thing only – Get Outside!

Many of us will spend the next few months doing everything we can to compensate for the cabin fever we experience during the colder months of the year. So, while you’re walking through the woods in your town, taking a much needed paddle down the river, or checking a...

As the daily temperatures slowly creep up to the sunny side of the freezing point, the nip in the New Hampshire air is being replaced by the familiar calls of songbirds. A chorus of buntings, vireos, tanagers, warblers, and more will soon be singing everywhere from backyards in Manchester to Durham’s College Woods to the great White Mountain Wilderness. For many wildlife enthusiasts, this soundtrack is a welcome break from winter’s whipping winds and silent snows.

We made it! High five, everyone! (weather.com)

But perhaps we should be a little more wary of these sirens of spring.

Savvy birders have known for a while that the sounds coming from our feathered friends are not just idle chatter. In fact, those sweet songs you hear on...

Pages

Subscribe to Stories