Taking Action for Wildlife banner

A Partnership of UNH Cooperative Extension and NH Fish and Game

Stories

As a fisheries biologist with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department (NHFG), I often get asked questions about the fish species that live in the state. It might be a student working on a school project or someone from a conservation organization working on a watershed management plan. University researchers, environmental regulators, anglers, land trusts, and conservation commissions have all requested fish data for a variety of reasons since I started with the department in 2004. The Inland Fisheries Division maintains a fish survey database with over 4,000 survey records going back to 1983. The database is frequently used by biologists within the department for conservation planning and fisheries management decisions. It was instrumental in the development of New Hampshire’s Wildlife Action Plan and it is frequently consulted for prioritizing restoration or watershed protection projects throughout New Hampshire.

...

--- by Jocelyn Duffy

Are you a citizen scientist? Do you want to be? The activity we call “science” began as citizen science centuries ago, with curious people asking questions about the world around them and looking for answers through observation and experimentation. Today, scientists are rediscovering the benefits of public participation in scientific research.

Anyone can become a citizen scientist by engaging in scientific work, usually in collaboration with or under the direction of professional scientists and scientific institutions. This is great for professional scientists because a research team with citizen scientists can collect more diverse data more quickly than the professional scientists alone could ever hope to collect, resulting in a more complete picture of whatever is being...

Sand and gravel pits are numerous and widespread throughout New Hampshire, making up about 0.35% of New Hampshire’s landscape. Often overlooked and left unreclaimed, or quickly turned over into industrial or commercial development; these landscapes are rarely as barren as they appear to be and can provide important and cVegetation was removed to provide turtle nesting habitat from an unreclaimed sand and gravel pit site located in southern New Hampshire. [Melissa Doperalski, NHFG]ritical habitat for a variety of species. Many of these species are considered species of greatest conservation need and some are state-listed...

This fall I’ve been slowing down a lot to allow squirrels and deer to cross the road. On rainy nights next spring I’ll stop to help frogs and salamanders cross and then come June I’ll help turtles. Animals move. For a variety of reasons. Depending on the species and time of year they may be looking for food, a mate, a place for their young, etc. The path they move along may not always be easy. Even fish encounter barriers to their movements. 

Wildlife corridors connect habitats so that wildlife can move between habitats. Wildlife corridors are critical for the conservation of wildlife in New Hampshire. The loss of wildlife corridors may result in direct mortality, habitat fragmentation, and barriers to dispersal. More specifically, mortality can affect the dispersal and viability of isolated populations, and eventually...

In July we said goodbye to our Taking Action for Wildlife colleague Emily Preston, wildlife biologist for NH Fish and Game’s Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, as she retired from a successful 13-year run at NHFG. 

Emily has led NHFG’s NH Wildlife Action Plan efforts since 2006 and was a key member of our Taking Action team. One of Emily’s primary roles at NHFG was to roll out the various updates of the Wildlife Action Plan and the associated maps. The fact that the NH Wildlife Action Plan has become part of the conservation communities’ common language and ‘go to’ resource is testament to Emily’s hard work and success. 

She worked extensively with partners like the UNH Cooperative Extension to create the...

Eastern brook trout.As a child, I followed my Mom and Dad into the woods on all sorts of different adventures.  I often participated in hobbies that my Dad enjoyed as a way to connect and spend time with him.  My Dad taught me about photography, hiking, skiing and canoeing. As he got older, fly-fishing became nearly an obsession for him, and so, as a dutiful daughter, a fly fisherman I became. 

I enjoyed hiking along the tiny backcountry streams with my Dad and my husband, hoping to outwit a rather wily brook trout who (I hoped) was less familiar with the trickery of artificial flies landing on the surface of the water than the fish in the larger streams nearer the road.  I caught as many trees as fish, but I did enjoy observing the river and the life that it nurtured.

One day, I...

In today’s high tech world, children are too often disconnected from nature and have little experience with their natural environment.  Schools do not have adequate support or experience to teach environmental subjects or connect students to local natural areas. To counteract this trend, the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions (NHACC) has developed a school partnership program to connect educators and elementary schools in an effort to integrate environmental education and local conservation.  Conservation commissions around the state are encouraging children to enjoy the outdoors and cultivating the next generation of environmental stewards by partnering with local schools....

Looking to improve wildlife habitat on your land?

NH Fish and Game’s Small Grants Program may be able to help. The Small Grants Program can help municipal, private, and land trust landowners, who own a minimum of 25 contiguous acres, restore or enhance habitat for wildlife. Funding of up to $4,000 per year (no more than $10,000 over a ten-year period) is available, plus it’s very simple to apply. Projects that may qualify for funding include: brush clearing or mowing to maintain grasslands and shrublands; release of old apple trees to improve wildlife food production; and maintenance of...

Spotted turtles are a state threatened species in New Hampshire. (Photo by Mike Marchand, NHFG)Spring 2018 kicked off the start of a new spotted turtle project to learn more about these small wetland turtles in order to develop better conservation actions.  Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program biologists will be using small baited turtle traps in wetlands and vernal pools to capture turtles where they are suspected to be. Each individual will then be given a series of small notches on its shell so that biologists can keep track where and when that turtle is caught again. This mark-recapture method allows us to estimate population sizes over time and that data will be compared regionally with other...

The 3 B’s of Winter Tree and Shrub ID: Branching, Bark, and Buds

Winter may seem like a lousy time to identify trees and shrubs. Without leaves to look at, things definitely get a little difficult, but with a few tricks (and maybe a good book) in hand you can up your botany game and learn to identify trees and shrubs without leaves! And why, you might ask, would we even bother to identify trees and shrubs in the winter?  Besides honing a skill to impress your friends and neighbors, a lot of management decisions are made in winter. The frozen ground reduces the impact of heavy machinery, making in and ideal time for a timber harvest, or wildlife habitat management. As such, it can be helpful to know what trees and shrubs are on your land to help guide management. Here are the 3 B’s of winter tree and shrub identification:

Branching
All trees and shrubs have one of two branching patterns.  They are either opposite, where twigs come...

Pages

Subscribe to Stories