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A Partnership of UNH Cooperative Extension and NH Fish and Game

Managing Wildlife Habitats

Making Fish Data More Accessible

As a fisheries biologist with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department (NHFG), I often get asked questions about the fish species that live in the state. It might be a student working on a school project or someone from a conservation organization working on a watershed management plan. University researchers, environmental regulators, anglers, land trusts, and conservation commissions have all requested fish data for a variety of reasons since I started with the department in 2004.

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Sand & Gravel Pits: Are we overlooking a solution to a critical habitat need?

Sand and gravel pits are numerous and widespread throughout New Hampshire, making up about 0.35% of New Hampshire’s landscape. Often overlooked and left unreclaimed, or quickly turned over into industrial or commercial development; these landscapes are rarely as barren as they appear to be and can provide important and cVegetation was removed to provide turtle nesting habitat from an unreclaimed sand and gravel pit site located in southern New Hampshire.</body></html>

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Wildlife Corridors in New Hampshre

This fall I’ve been slowing down a lot to allow squirrels and deer to cross the road. On rainy nights next spring I’ll stop to help frogs and salamanders cross and then come June I’ll help turtles. Animals move. For a variety of reasons. Depending on the species and time of year they may be looking for food, a mate, a place for their young, etc. The path they move along may not always be easy.

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Bringing Back Brookies: Improving Stream Habitat for Brook Trout

Eastern brook trout.As a child, I followed my Mom and Dad into the woods on all sorts of different adventures.  I often participated in hobbies that my Dad enjoyed as a way to connect and spend time with him.  My Dad taught me about photography, hiking, skiing and canoeing. As he got older, fly-fishing became nearly an obsession for him, and so, as a dutiful daughter, a fly fisherman I became. 

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Maintaining Traditions at Leonard Wildlife Management Area

As we walk through the woods we see a 10-15” diameter aspen here and there plus an occasional clump amidst what would otherwise be characterized as a pine-oak-maple stand with some beech, paper birch, and white ash. We see stone walls and tote roads dividing up these woods into clear sections or blocks. And as we approach a small old field, we see a couple of scattered apple trees along the edge that are way past their prime. There are a couple of old foundations, and just to the west of the field is a patch of huge multi-stemmed bull pine.

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