Landowner

Locate Funding for Land Protection

Land conservation needs funding! There are costs involved in purchasing the land or purchasing a conservation easement. Even if the easement or the land is donated, there are still costs associated with a land conservation project, e.g. appraisal and survey costs, legal fees, land trust costs, etc. Partnering with a land trust that has an interest in the land being conserved is recommended, especially since they can help locate and apply for funding sources when they work in partnership with a community.

Become a NH Coverts Project Volunteer

NH Coverts volunteers are landowners, local decision-makers, teachers, business people, writers, retirees — anyone who wants to help wildlife in New Hampshire. Volunteers attend a one-time 3½- day training workshop held each spring. You’ll learn about wildlife conservation, forest stewardship, and effective outreach from a team of natural resource professionals.

Restore and Manage Grasslands

Grassland habitats are an increasingly rare site in New Hampshire, but more than 70 species of wildlife use these open areas of fields and wildflowers to meet their needs for food, cover, or breeding. The most common grassland habitats in New Hampshire are agricultural fields such as hayfields, pastures and fallow fields.

Submit wildlife observations to NH Wildlife Sightings

Many potentially useful observations of wildlife are made by landowners, recreationists, birders, hunters and fishermen, foresters, and general wildlife enthusiasts. Through NH Wildlife Sightings, professionals and other citizens can report their wildlife observations.

Get Money for Management

Managing habitat for wildlife can require some out-of-pocket expenses for landowners. The good news is that programs exist to off-set costs. UNH Cooperative Extension maintains a simple overview of the programs available to landowners in NH.  A good first stop to learn about financial assistance is to contact your local UNH Cooperative Extension county forester to learn what programs might fit your land and your interests.

Create and Manage Young Forest Habitat

Shrubland habitats are used by over 100 species of wildlife in NH and are critically important to many. Despite their importance to wildlife, these habitats have become increasingly rare in NH and as a result, many of the species that use and/or rely on this habitat have shown declining population numbers in recent years.

Report Invasive Insects

Invasive insects and diseases can have devastating impacts on the managed and natural environments into which they are introduced. These introduced pests can have serious negative impacts on agricultre and forestry. Some invasive pests of concern in New Hampshire right now include emerald ash borer, hemlock woolly adelgid, and asian longhorned beetle (not yet in NH, but nearby).

Restore and Maintain Older Forests

While there has been a regional focus on the lack of and need to create young, early-successional habitat in recent years, there is also recognition and consensus from wildlife biologists about the importance of older, late-successional forests for wildlife. Many of the components of these mature forests - large living and dead trees and downed woody material, for example - are important to a variety of wildlife species.

Building Trails? Consider Wildlife

Hiking, mountain biking, bird watching, horseback riding, snowmobiling -- these are just some of the ways we get outside to enjoy nature and unwind from our day-to-day activities. However, even these seeming harmless activities can have impacts on wildlife including reduced abundance, reproduction, and survival. Thoughtful trail location allows us to get outside to enjoy nature and also minimize disturbance to wildlife.

Use Untreated Plants

Pesticides have received significant attention for their potential role in pollinator population declines. Individuals and communities who are looking to help conserve pollinators can plant habitat that supports their populations, including a diversity of flowering plants. However, some seeds and plants sold at garden centers have been previously treated with systemic pesticides, including neonicotinoids. This can threaten bees and other pollinators as they pollinate or forage on treated plants.