Landowner

Photo by Ben Kilham.

Avoid Negative Human-Wildlife Interactions

We love wildlife, but when wild animals are in the wrong place at the wrong time - bears at your birdfeeder, skunks under your porch, or deer in the garden - you need a strategy. When wildlife/human conflicts occur, it's important to remember that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Each wildlife problem is unique and you need to have some understanding of the animal and the available control methods before beginning any control strategy.

Restore and Manage Grasslands

Grassland habitats are an increasingly rare site in New Hampshire, but more than 70 species of wildlife use these open areas of fields and wildflowers to meet their needs for food, cover, or breeding. The most common grassland habitats in New Hampshire are agricultural fields such as hayfields, pastures and fallow fields.

Become a NH Coverts Project Volunteer

NH Coverts volunteers are landowners, local decision-makers, teachers, business people, writers, retirees — anyone who wants to help wildlife in New Hampshire. Volunteers attend a one-time 3½- day training workshop held each spring. You’ll learn about wildlife conservation, forest stewardship, and effective outreach from a team of natural resource professionals.

Promote Native Plants

Many familiar plants in our gardens, fields, and along roadsides are not native to New Hampshire. While the majority cause no harm to natural habitat or managed farms and forests, some do and are considered invasive plants. Invasive plants can reduce biodiversity, imperil rare species, reduce wildlife habitat by eliminating native foods or changing cover or nest sites, degrade water quality, reduce forest and farm crop production, and cause human health problems. 

Become a Citizen Scientist

Citizen Science is a process by which both professional and volunteer scientists collaborate to investigate the world around them. Anyone can become a citizen scientist by engaging in scientific research, usually in collaboration with or under the direction of professional scientists and scientific institutions.

Minimize Soil Disturbance

Invasive plants often take over places where soils or existing plants have been disturbed – sites like field edges, abondoned farms, roadsides, or at trailheads. One of the best things you can do to minimize the spread of invasive plants is to leave soils and areas of native plants alone, especially in places where invasive plants are nearby.

Locate Funding for Land Protection

Land conservation needs funding! There are costs involved in purchasing the land or purchasing a conservation easement. Even if the easement or the land is donated, there are still costs associated with a land conservation project, e.g. appraisal and survey costs, legal fees, land trust costs, etc. Partnering with a land trust that has an interest in the land being conserved is recommended, especially since they can help locate and apply for funding sources when they work in partnership with a community.

Restore and Maintain Older Forests

While there has been a regional focus on the lack of and need to create young, early-successional habitat in recent years, there is also recognition and consensus from wildlife biologists about the importance of older, late-successional forests for wildlife. Many of the components of these mature forests - large living and dead trees and downed woody material, for example - are important to a variety of wildlife species.

Submit wildlife observations to NH Wildlife Sightings

Many potentially useful observations of wildlife are made by landowners, recreationists, birders, hunters and fishermen, foresters, and general wildlife enthusiasts. Through NH Wildlife Sightings, professionals and other citizens can report their wildlife observations.

Create and Manage Young Forest Habitat

Shrubland habitats are used by over 100 species of wildlife in NH and are critically important to many. Despite their importance to wildlife, these habitats have become increasingly rare in NH and as a result, many of the species that use and/or rely on this habitat have shown declining population numbers in recent years.