Landowner

Get Money for Management

Managing habitat for wildlife can require some out-of-pocket expenses for landowners. The good news is that programs exist to off-set costs. UNH Cooperative Extension maintains a simple overview of the programs available to landowners in NH.  A good first stop to learn about financial assistance is to contact your local UNH Cooperative Extension county forester to learn what programs might fit your land and your interests.

Become a NH Coverts Project Volunteer

NH Coverts volunteers are landowners, local decision-makers, teachers, business people, writers, retirees — anyone who wants to help wildlife in New Hampshire. Volunteers attend a one-time 3½- day training workshop held each spring. You’ll learn about wildlife conservation, forest stewardship, and effective outreach from a team of natural resource professionals.

Control Invasive Plants

People who are aware of the problems associated with invasive plants can end up getting discouraged, once they realize that yes, they are all over the place. But don’t get discouraged! The good news is that they are not everywhere in New Hampshire, and there are options for towns, conservation groups, private landowners, and public agencies to actively work to control invasive plants.

Plant a Pollinator Garden

Honey bees and other pollinating insects are crucial to our fruit and vegetable production and contributing to a healthy ecosystem. Unfortunately, pollinators face a number of threats, from habitat loss and degradation to nonnative species and diseases, pesticide misuse, and climate change.

Seek help from a Licensed Forester

A professional licensed forester will help you to develop and execute a vision and plan for your property. Working with a licensed forester will help you determine what wildlife management activities can be incorporated into a management plan to create the forest you want in 20 or 50 years.

Use agricultural practices that promote good wildlife habitat

Farmland provides biological diversity in the landscape, benefiting a number of wildlife species. Farmers can adapt agricultural practices to increase ecosystem stability in the face of environmental change, benefiting both wildlife and agricultural yield. Grassland habitats (such as hayfields) benefit a variety of wildlife species. especially grassland-nesting birds that require large tracts of grassland, typically 25 acres or larger, for food, cover and breeding.

Report Invasive Insects

Invasive insects and diseases can have devastating impacts on the managed and natural environments into which they are introduced. These introduced pests can have serious negative impacts on agricultre and forestry. Some invasive pests of concern in New Hampshire right now include emerald ash borer, hemlock woolly adelgid, and asian longhorned beetle (not yet in NH, but nearby).

Minimize Soil Disturbance

Invasive plants often take over places where soils or existing plants have been disturbed – sites like field edges, abondoned farms, roadsides, or at trailheads. One of the best things you can do to minimize the spread of invasive plants is to leave soils and areas of native plants alone, especially in places where invasive plants are nearby.

Learn about the Impacts of Climate Change on Wildlife and Habitats

Climate change is throwing a number of curveballs at NH's wildlife. While rising temperatures often get the most attention, we're also seeing wackier, less predictable weather in general.

Restore and Manage Grasslands

Grassland habitats are an increasingly rare site in New Hampshire, but more than 70 species of wildlife use these open areas of fields and wildflowers to meet their needs for food, cover, or breeding. The most common grassland habitats in New Hampshire are agricultural fields such as hayfields, pastures and fallow fields.