Landowner

Get Money for Management

Managing habitat for wildlife can require some out-of-pocket expenses for landowners. The good news is that programs exist to off-set costs. UNH Cooperative Extension maintains a simple overview of the programs available to landowners in NH.  A good first stop to learn about financial assistance is to contact your local UNH Cooperative Extension county forester to learn what programs might fit your land and your interests.

Photo by Ben Kilham.

Avoid Negative Human-Wildlife Interactions

We love wildlife, but when wild animals are in the wrong place at the wrong time - bears at your birdfeeder, skunks under your porch, or deer in the garden - you need a strategy. When wildlife/human conflicts occur, it's important to remember that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Each wildlife problem is unique and you need to have some understanding of the animal and the available control methods before beginning any control strategy.

Restore and Maintain Older Forests

While there has been a regional focus on the lack of and need to create young, early-successional habitat in recent years, there is also recognition and consensus from wildlife biologists about the importance of older, late-successional forests for wildlife. Many of the components of these mature forests - large living and dead trees and downed woody material, for example - are important to a variety of wildlife species.

Learn to Identify Invasive Plants

Invasive plants pose a serious threat to our native habitats and wildlife. One of the best things you can do to help stop the spread of invasive plants is to learn how to tell them apart from other plants.

Spread the Word on Invasives

Many people are not aware of invasive species or the potential problems they create. Helping to educate others about invasives increases the number of people aware of and working to control them. There are many ways to reach your neighbors, community members, or landowners that you work with. For example,

Become a Citizen Scientist

Citizen Science is a process by which both professional and volunteer scientists collaborate to investigate the world around them. Anyone can become a citizen scientist by engaging in scientific research, usually in collaboration with or under the direction of professional scientists and scientific institutions.

Map Invasive Plants

Have you seen a new invasive plant in New Hampshire? Are you planning a stewardship or invasive plant control project in New Hampshire? You can use a program called EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System) on your computer, smartphone or tablet to map invasive plants and record your control efforts. EDDMapS also has information about invasive plant species, distribution, and identification tips.

Building Trails? Consider Wildlife

Hiking, mountain biking, bird watching, horseback riding, snowmobiling -- these are just some of the ways we get outside to enjoy nature and unwind from our day-to-day activities. However, even these seeming harmless activities can have impacts on wildlife including reduced abundance, reproduction, and survival. Thoughtful trail location allows us to get outside to enjoy nature and also minimize disturbance to wildlife.

Restore and Manage Grasslands

Grassland habitats are an increasingly rare site in New Hampshire, but more than 70 species of wildlife use these open areas of fields and wildflowers to meet their needs for food, cover, or breeding. The most common grassland habitats in New Hampshire are agricultural fields such as hayfields, pastures and fallow fields.

Volunteer at an Invasive Plant Workday

A great way to learn how to recognize and control invasive plants is to become a volunteer yourself. For many of us, hands-on learning is a great way to educate ourselves.