Landowner

Become a NH Coverts Project Volunteer

NH Coverts volunteers are landowners, local decision-makers, teachers, business people, writers, retirees — anyone who wants to help wildlife in New Hampshire. Volunteers attend a one-time 3½- day training workshop held each spring. You’ll learn about wildlife conservation, forest stewardship, and effective outreach from a team of natural resource professionals.

Seek help from a Licensed Forester

A professional licensed forester will help you to develop and execute a vision and plan for your property. Working with a licensed forester will help you determine what wildlife management activities can be incorporated into a management plan to create the forest you want in 20 or 50 years.

Learn about the Impacts of Climate Change on Wildlife and Habitats

Climate change is throwing a number of curveballs at NH's wildlife. While rising temperatures often get the most attention, we're also seeing wackier, less predictable weather in general.

Create and Manage Young Forest Habitat

Shrubland habitats are used by over 100 species of wildlife in NH and are critically important to many. Despite their importance to wildlife, these habitats have become increasingly rare in NH and as a result, many of the species that use and/or rely on this habitat have shown declining population numbers in recent years.

Spread the Word on Invasives

Many people are not aware of invasive species or the potential problems they create. Helping to educate others about invasives increases the number of people aware of and working to control them. There are many ways to reach your neighbors, community members, or landowners that you work with. For example,

Contact Your County Forester

Contacting your county extension forester is a good first step in discovering the resources on your land.  Your county forester can walk the land with you and help you understand what wildlife resources you have. They can talk with you about the hopes and dreams you have for your land and help you develop goals and objectives. They can talk with you about alternative actions you can take to achieve wildlife enhancement goals.

Photo by Ben Kilham.

Avoid Negative Human-Wildlife Interactions

We love wildlife, but when wild animals are in the wrong place at the wrong time - bears at your birdfeeder, skunks under your porch, or deer in the garden - you need a strategy. When wildlife/human conflicts occur, it's important to remember that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Each wildlife problem is unique and you need to have some understanding of the animal and the available control methods before beginning any control strategy.

Attend Workshops on Good Stewardship

Conservation and education organizations throughout New Hampshire offer a variety of workshops and trainings focused on wildlife habitats, forest management, and good stewardship. Attending one of these workshops can provide a great learning experience and often involves a chance to go in the field to observe the natural resources or management being discussed, interaction with professionals, and learning from the experiences of others. Workshops can range from short indoor presentations to day-long outdoor field trips.

Get Money for Management

Managing habitat for wildlife can require some out-of-pocket expenses for landowners. The good news is that programs exist to off-set costs. UNH Cooperative Extension maintains a simple overview of the programs available to landowners in NH.  A good first stop to learn about financial assistance is to contact your local UNH Cooperative Extension county forester to learn what programs might fit your land and your interests.

Promote Native Plants

Many familiar plants in our gardens, fields, and along roadsides are not native to New Hampshire. While the majority cause no harm to natural habitat or managed farms and forests, some do and are considered invasive plants. Invasive plants can reduce biodiversity, imperil rare species, reduce wildlife habitat by eliminating native foods or changing cover or nest sites, degrade water quality, reduce forest and farm crop production, and cause human health problems.