Interested Citizen

Volunteer to Monitor Water Quality

Volunteers throughout New Hampshire help to monitor and protect the water quality of our rivers, streams, and lakes. You can get involved to help collect samples and promote the importance of maintaining water quality. Visit specific program sites below for more information.

Promote Native Plants

Many familiar plants in our gardens, fields, and along roadsides are not native to New Hampshire. While the majority cause no harm to natural habitat or managed farms and forests, some do and are considered invasive plants. Invasive plants can reduce biodiversity, imperil rare species, reduce wildlife habitat by eliminating native foods or changing cover or nest sites, degrade water quality, reduce forest and farm crop production, and cause human health problems. 

Take Action to Reduce your Contribution to Climate Change

Ultimately, the best way to protect wildlife and habitats in the face of climate change is to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that are contributing to the problem. The first step is to understand our individual and organizational/community contributions to climate change, also known as our "carbon footprint" - i.e. how much greenhouse gas emissions do our activities and behaviors contribute to the atmosphere. Check out this Carbon Footprint Calculator from The Nature Conservancy. From there, we can identify opportunities to reduce these emissions by making changes to our behaviors.

Become a Citizen Scientist

Citizen Science is a process by which both professional and volunteer scientists collaborate to investigate the world around them. Anyone can become a citizen scientist by engaging in scientific research, usually in collaboration with or under the direction of professional scientists and scientific institutions.

Volunteer at an Invasive Plant Workday

A great way to learn how to recognize and control invasive plants is to become a volunteer yourself. For many of us, hands-on learning is a great way to educate ourselves.

Identify and Protect Wildlife Corridors

Wildlife travel corridors are critical for the conservation of wildlife in New Hampshire. The loss of wildlife corridors may result in direct mortality, habitat fragmentation, and barriers to movement.

Attend Workshops on Good Stewardship

Conservation and education organizations throughout New Hampshire offer a variety of workshops and trainings focused on wildlife habitats, forest management, and good stewardship. Attending one of these workshops can provide a great learning experience and often involves a chance to go in the field to observe the natural resources or management being discussed, interaction with professionals, and learning from the experiences of others. Workshops can range from short indoor presentations to day-long outdoor field trips.

Support Inclusion of Wildlife and Climate in Planning, Policies, and Regulations

There are many opportunities for municipalities to include climate impacts and wildlife protection in plans, policies, and regulations. It's important for local residents, interested citizens, and municipal board members advocate for the incorporation of these topics into relevant documents, so that the municipal staff and boards responsible for these documents know there is local support.

Map Invasive Plants

Have you seen a new invasive plant in New Hampshire? Are you planning a stewardship or invasive plant control project in New Hampshire? You can use a program called EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System) on your computer, smartphone or tablet to map invasive plants and record your control efforts. EDDMapS also has information about invasive plant species, distribution, and identification tips.

Use agricultural practices that promote good wildlife habitat

Farmland provides biological diversity in the landscape, benefiting a number of wildlife species. Farmers can adapt agricultural practices to increase ecosystem stability in the face of environmental change, benefiting both wildlife and agricultural yield. Grassland habitats (such as hayfields) benefit a variety of wildlife species. especially grassland-nesting birds that require large tracts of grassland, typically 25 acres or larger, for food, cover and breeding.