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Making Fish Data More Accessible

As a fisheries biologist with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department (NHFG), I often get asked questions about the fish species that live in the state. It might be a student working on a school project or someone from a conservation organization working on a watershed management plan. University researchers, environmental regulators, anglers, land trusts, and conservation commissions have all requested fish data for a variety of reasons since I started with the department in 2004.

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Science Needs You!

--- by Jocelyn Duffy

Are you a citizen scientist? Do you want to be? The activity we call “science” began as citizen science centuries ago, with curious people asking questions about the world around them and looking for answers through observation and experimentation. Today, scientists are rediscovering the benefits of public participation in scientific research.

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Sand & Gravel Pits: Are we overlooking a solution to a critical habitat need?

Sand and gravel pits are numerous and widespread throughout New Hampshire, making up about 0.35% of New Hampshire’s landscape. Often overlooked and left unreclaimed, or quickly turned over into industrial or commercial development; these landscapes are rarely as barren as they appear to be and can provide important and cVegetation was removed to provide turtle nesting habitat from an unreclaimed sand and gravel pit site located in southern New Hampshire.</body></html>

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Wildlife Corridors in New Hampshre

This fall I’ve been slowing down a lot to allow squirrels and deer to cross the road. On rainy nights next spring I’ll stop to help frogs and salamanders cross and then come June I’ll help turtles. Animals move. For a variety of reasons. Depending on the species and time of year they may be looking for food, a mate, a place for their young, etc. The path they move along may not always be easy.

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NHACC 48th Annual Meeting and Conference

Don’t miss the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions (NHACC) 47th Annual Meeting and Conference, featuring keynote speaker, Professor Richard Primack, Boston University presenting The Effects of Climate Change on the Plants and Animals of Thoreau’s Concord. The event will be held on Saturday, November 3, 2017 from 8 am to 3:30 pm. 

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Bringing Back Brookies: Improving Stream Habitat for Brook Trout

Eastern brook trout.As a child, I followed my Mom and Dad into the woods on all sorts of different adventures.  I often participated in hobbies that my Dad enjoyed as a way to connect and spend time with him.  My Dad taught me about photography, hiking, skiing and canoeing. As he got older, fly-fishing became nearly an obsession for him, and so, as a dutiful daughter, a fly fisherman I became. 

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Education & Conservation: Partnering Local Schools and Conservation Commissions

In today’s high tech world, children are too often disconnected from nature and have little experience with their natural environment.  Schools do not have adequate support or experience to teach environmental subjects or connect students to local natural areas. To counteract this trend, the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions (NHACC) has developed a school partnership program to connect educators and elementary schools in an effort to integrate environmental education and local conservation.

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Wildlife Workshops at NHACC Conference

Don't miss the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions (NHACC) 47th Annual Meeting and Conference, featuring Sylvia Bates, Director of Standards & Educational Services at the Land Trust Alliance.

Join NHACC for a day of learning, networking and fun with fellow conservation commission members. The event will be held on Saturday, November 4, 2017 from 8 am to 3:30 pm.

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