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A Partnership of UNH Cooperative Extension and NH Fish and Game

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WAP101: Get to Know the Wildlife Action Plan

During the several public input sessions we hosted for the revision of the Wildlife Action Plan, one message came out loud and clear. You wanted to know, more clearly, the actions you could take to help New Hampshire's wildlife. And you wanted to have information about Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and their habitats at your fingertips.

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Beavers

In comic books and in Hollywood movies, arch-villains are often highly mechanized and possess awesome super powers. We watch battles unfold pitting good versus evil as they unleash their devious plans against each other for control of the earth.

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Got Wildlife?

Can you help us figure out how to incorporate wildlife information into our Master Plan Update? What steps should we take to include wildlife in our Natural Resources Inventory? How can we educate our residents about the value of wildlife and habitats? The Taking Action for Wildlife team has been hard at work helping communities answer these questions and use data and maps from the updated 2015 Wildlife Action Plan. Since January, we have assisted 10 communities across New Hampshire.

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Where There are Birds, Bees, and No Trees: Grasslands in New Hampshire

Most of us Granite Staters are enamored, maybe even infatuated, with the forests of New Hampshire. It’s hard not to be. They cover about 84% of the state after all, and include a variety of 86 native tree species that blanket the landscape in a patchwork of leaves and needles, bark and branches. But every once in a while there’s a break in the canopy. These gaps provide diversity to the forested landscape – many include shrublands, wetlands, rocky areas, or water bodies.

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Campton - 2016 Natural Resources Inventory

When Campton decided to update their Natural Resources Inventory in 2014 - their previous NRI dated back to 2005 - they decided to work on it as a volunteer project, sharing the tasks among conservation commission members. They also had the assistance of a local volunteer with GIS skills to create the natural resources maps. View the Campton Natural Resources Inventory

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Teaming Up for Turtles

Big things can happen for wildlife when dedicated volunteers team up with biologists around the state. This is what happened in the town of Newmarket with a critical call-to-action for motorists to be aware of rare turtles attempting to cross roads. In late May and June each year, female turtles of every species must make their way to open, sandy areas to lay their eggs.

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Vernal Pools: An Important Resource for Wildlife

Vernal pools are home to many wildlife species, including those that breed exclusively in this habitat type – fairy shrimp, wood frogs, and spotted salamanders. “These temporary wetlands are often small and dry in late summer, and therefore are easily overlooked during land-use planning,” explains NH Fish and Game wetlands biologist Michael Marchand. This is a big concern for several Species of Greatest Conservation Need that are associated with vernal pools, such as Blue-spotted, Jefferson, and marbled salamanders (a state-endangered species).

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