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As part of the revision of the Wildlife Acton Plan, two sets of maps have been updated and released for use by conservation planners, landowners, land trusts, biologists and others. The two existing habitat-based maps have been redone with the latest available information, and a new third map was created for surface water habitat types (lakes, ponds, rivers and streams). For those of you new to the Plan, the first two maps have been around since 2006 and were updated in 2010. One is a habitat map, showing where the different types of wildlife habitat are located throughout the state. The other map shows where habitat exists in the best ecological condition – based on biodiversity, arrangement of habitat types on the landscape, and lack of human impacts. 

The revised habitat map includes more habitat types. Locations of swamps (...

The 2015 update of the NH Wildlife Action Plan included an extensive amount of public participation. 166 individuals representing 79 communities participated in public engagement sessions held throughout the state. 1,142 people responded to an online survey to express their concerns and priorities for wildlife in New Hampshire. 123 people provided comments on a draft of the Plan prior to its submission. And what did we hear during this process? YOU want to take action! Public input from interested citizens like you helped craft a Plan that provides more than 100 specific actions that can be taken by communities, conservation groups, landowners, state agencies, natural resources professionals and others to protect and manage wildlife and habitats in New Hampshire. Based on your feedback, we have worked to make the actions you can take much more accessible and easy to find. Below, you'll find some...

The strangely unique horseshoe crab is one of five marine species that are considered Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in New Hampshire. Particularly if you are a birder or a fisherman, you may already know the important ecological role that the horseshoe crab serves. Each year, these animals lay masses of eggs on coastal beaches, many of which become a source of energy-rich nutrition for migrating shorebirds. Seasoned fishermen know that horseshoe crab eggs are great attractant for American eel, lobster, and conch.  

Horseshoe crab populations in the northeast may be in some trouble. In addition to some environmental stressors, approximately 500,000 horseshoe crabs are collected each year by the biomedical industry for Limulus amebocyte lysate -- a component of their unique blue blood that can detect foreign bacteria on medical instruments and in drugs. Once a portion of their blood has been collected for this purpose, the horseshoe crabs are returned back to...

Where else can you learn about New Hampshire’s 27 unique habitat types, research threats to wildlife, and find lists of actions you and your community can take to protect wildlife? The revised New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan has it all! The long-awaited release of the updated Plan includes new planning tools and updated wildlife habitat maps just waiting for you to get your hands on.

The NH Wildlife Action Plan has been updated for the first time since 2005 and it couldn’t have been done without the help of many NH citizens who participated in the process! 166 people representing 79 communities and an array of non-profit, municipal, state and federal agencies, and private landowners participated in public engagement sessions. 1,142 people responded to an online survey and 123...

What do you get when you give 135 high school sophomores an armload of heavy pointed shovels, pick-axes, and hacksaws, and send them off into the woods?

Well, that’s not a joke, so don’t wait for a punchline.

What you get are acres of field and wooded areas made more inviting to bees, monarch butterflies, birds, and even rabbits: all of the flying and crawling critters whose actions help pollinate plant life and perpetuate the natural cycles that keep interdependent plant and animal species healthy. The day-long field event was the culmination of a month-long study at Sanborn Regional High School, working in collaboration with the Kingston conservation commission, on the essential role of biodiversity in ecosystems.

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The Francestown Conservation Plan was based on the Francestown Natural Resources Inventory. The Natural Resources Inventory is incorporated as an Appendix to the Conservation Plan. The maps for each document are housed on the town's website. Click here to view the Francestown Conservation Plan maps and the Francestown NRI Maps.

The Conservation Plan and the Natural Resources Inventory were both created in 2013 as part of a collaborative project between the...

Several groups of people huddled over the Wildlife Action Plan maps, a buzz of animated conversation filling the room. Taking Action for Wildlife had come to Alstead, and more than 30 community members were discussing and identifying important habitat areas in town. This was part of the Monadnock Conservancy’s “Community Conservation Partnership” which successfully engaged more than 12 communities in the region from 2008 – 2014. The Conservancy, a land trust covering 35 towns in Cheshire and Western Hillsborough counties, worked with these communities to develop comprehensive Open Space/Conservation Plans that incorporated Natural Resources Inventory data, including wildlife information. By working with communities over a period of intense engagement (several months to a year), the Conservancy was successful in...

Recognizing the need for a comprehensive summary of the town's natural resources that would assist the New Durham Conservation Commission in public education and outreach and help build support for future conservation initiatives, New Durham undertook and completed their Natural Resources Inventory in 2011. The New Durham NRI includes a comprehensive wildlife section using information from the NH Wildlife Action Plan. View the New Durham NRI and the associated maps on the town's website.

Take a look at the...

The Town of Easton, in northern Grafton County, has a way with coming up with catchy names. Their “Pastry and Preservation” conservation events have drawn local residents to enjoy good food and learn about the town’s natural resources. So no big surprise that they came up with “Got Wildlife?”, a creative activity to engage residents in recording wildlife sightings in town. They hung a map of town right outside the town clerk’s office (with permission, of course!) where there are often residents standing in line. A pen hung from a string, and a notepad and some small round stickers were posted alongside. Residents were encouraged to place a sticker on the map where they had spotted a wildlife species in town, give the sticker a number and then write down what species were seen on the notepad (using the corresponding number). Since then, this has...

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