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The NH Wildlife Action Plan has been guiding work to protect and enhance wildlife and habitats across the state for 9 years now. With the Plan, and the many tools that have been created to help implement it — such as the wildlife habitat maps and the Taking Action for Wildlife Program — NHFG and its many partners have protected over 235,000 acres of wildlife habitat. Of the over 1.8 million acres of protected habitat in NH, 84% is habitat that is highest ranked in the Wildlife Action Plan maps.

There are many other ways that the Wildlife Action Plan has been implemented. Over 35 towns have worked to protect or enhance wildlife habitat through creating natural resource inventories, conservation plans, town forest management plans and/or engaging citizens on town conservation lands.  Ospreys and Coopers hawks were removed from the...

The LeClair Tree Farm

For the past 30 years, Art and Gale LeClair have been putting their dreams into action as they manage their 120 acre woodlot in Farmington, New Hampshire. Much of the LeClair’s home is constructed with wood harvested from their land, and the poorer quality trees that Art removes in thinning operations provide fuel for the wood-fired furnace that heats their home. Their property also serves as an outdoor classroom for schools and camp groups.

Following a management plan and working with natural resource professionals, the LeClair’s have identified goals for their property and have spent countless hours working toward those goals. In addition to improving the quality of the trees they are growing, a primary goal of the LeClair’s is to improve the wildlife habitat throughout their property by providing more food sources, better cover, and more open space in different parts of their woodland....

 

Those who care about wildlife in New Hampshire have a new way to lend a hand. The Stewardship Network: New England launched a new website at newengland.stewardshipnetwork.org that makes it easier for people to volunteer for nature-based projects, including those focused on wildlife and their habitats. Our goal is to connect more citizens to the outdoors through meaningful, well-organized land stewardship and environmental research volunteer projects.

The Network is mobilizing volunteers to care for and study lands and waters. Since the website’s launch last spring, the Network has connected hundreds of volunteers with more than 70 conservation partners on over 120 different volunteer workdays, research...

The Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program is excited to announce the release of its updated online reporting system, NH Wildlife Sightings. For those who have used the site previously, you’ll enjoy an updated look and feel, drop-down menus and check-offs that make it even easier to report your wildlife observations. For anyone who hasn’t used the site before—now is the time to start!

NH Wildlife Sightings is the place where your observations are connected directly with the biologists who study and track NH’s wildlife species. Perhaps one summer you come across a green snake in your yard— biologists can use that information to better understand the range of green snakes in the state. Or maybe over the next few years you keep track of the different turtle species you see at your favorite...

Read about the White family - homesteaders who live on and work their Sandwich, New Hampshire property as a way of life, but who are also benefiting wildlife and habitats. Written by Malin Clyde, UNH Cooperative Extension for Northern Woodlands Magazine, March 2007.

Read about a New Hampshire family who lives on their land with an eye towards raising children who know how to play (and work) outdoors. Written by Malin Clyde, UNH Cooperative Extension for Northern Woodlands Magazine, March 2008.

 

Don’t say you haven’t been warned. When you visit Dave and Tanya Tellman, landowners in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, you will be meeting the sort of forest enthusiasts that will make you want to go out and buy a big chunk of land, whether or not you have the time, the energy, or the means. Their passion for forestry, for plants, for wildlife, for working in the woods, for tilling the soil and harvesting fruits and vegetables from their land is deeply inspiring. I’ve spent the weeks since visiting them this summer quietly scheming about how

I, too, might get a hold of a piece of land, start building trails, plant a giant garden, create some wildlife openings…Unfortunately, at the moment, I have trouble taking down the laundry when it rains, so large-scale landownership may not be an option for my family right now. But I’m warning you. You...

I sat at my desk, eyes glued to my computer screen, flipping slowly through photos. I’m giddy with excitement, enjoying the scenes unfolding, snapshot by snapshot, in front of me. A beaver makes its way out of the pond and passes next to the camera, then in the next shot, I see it is pulling a shockingly large log behind it.  I’ve seen the evidence of beaver’s work so many times, it barely catches my attention anymore, but there is something magical about seeing pictures of the animal at work. I love seeing how it maneuvers with such a large branch, observing what time of day or night they are active, how many times they make the trip back and forth.  I continue flipping, photo after photo.  Then suddenly, something unexpected pops into the photo.  I let out an audible squeal.  A bobcat!

I...

When Taking Action for Wildlife came to Andover in the fall of 2012, the six-member conservation commission knew what they wanted to do - find creative ways to engage local residents and raise awareness about the value of wildlife habitats in Andover. They rolled up their sleeves and got to work right away. The group spent the winter months planning a program of public outreach activities to run from spring through fall, 2013. They included a mix of outdoor field trips, indoor slide presentations and a photo exhibit.  The outreach series was very successful, drawing well over 130 people to one or more of these events - each event was attended by 20-70 people and this was all accomplished with a minimal budget! Here’s how they went about it.  

Each conservation commission member took the the lead for...

Fred Ernst owns 670 acres of forestland in Acworth, NH. His interest in managing land for wildlife began during his career in a forest-based industry. As Fred describes it, “We practiced sustainability of forests and encouraging wildlife was a natural part of the process. When I bought the land in Acworth in 2001, the land had been “high graded” [most commercial quality trees removed], which had a lot to do with my ideas for improvement”.

“The NH Coverts Project convinced me to actively manage the land for wildlife.” [Note: NH Coverts Project, administered by UNH Cooperative Extension, trains volunteers to promote wildlife habitat conservation and forest stewardship.]

Fred says he thought carefully about his goals and what to do to realize them and he took time to learn more about forests, forestry and habitats.

“...

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